Does the human mind have the power to heal us?

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Does the human mind have the capacity to heal us?

Some in the medical and psychiatric research fields have been saying that the human mind enables us to heal ourselves. A good example of this type of thinking is Bruce Lipton, Ph.D., stem cell biologist and author of several science books.  In a recent video on his website he says, “When we change our thoughts, behaviors, and beliefs, we can change our biology. We are the masters of our lives not the victim of our genes.”

Good thoughts are certainly beneficial. But do the good thoughts that heal have their source in the human mind or in something more all encompassing and universal?  Weighing against the notion of the human mind as a healing force are situations where one is unconscious or unable to think clearly and yet experiences mental healing. Consider the experience of neurosurgeon Eben Alexander, author of Proof of Heaven: A Neurosurgeon’s Journey into the Afterlife.

Alexander had been diagnosed as having a disease that shut down his brain activity, and he was in a coma for seven days. Brain scans indicated no ability to think. The prognosis was that he had a slim chance of surviving and an even worse chance of being able to function normally if he did survive. But, he did awake from the coma and fully recovered.

In his book, Alexander says that, while in the coma, he felt unconditional love and acceptance from an all-loving Divine Being and a sense of being forever part of this divine presence. This awareness deepened the longer he was in this presence, and it brought him great peace. He also said that although he appeared to others to be in a coma, he began to feel and recognize the effects of the prayers of his family and fellow Christian church members.

Finally, Alexander said that he had an intuition, more like a message, that he was going back. Shortly after that he opened his eyes, sat up and said: “all is well.” It took another week or so for a full return to normalcy.

It seems to me that this healing came as a result of a divine influence, that brought to him a greater sense of the love of God and his permanent place in this infinite Love. And my sense is that the love of the family and church members and their prayers were expressions of this divine influence.

Who wouldn’t want to feel the unconditional love of the Divine Being? How do we move toward feeling this divine love in our lives?  Christian author Mary Baker Eddy, a sincere student of the Bible, experienced the healing love of God in her life and healed others through her understanding of this love as a divine Principle.  In her primary work, Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures, she discusses how to access divine Love. She writes: “What we most need is the prayer of fervent desire for growth in grace, expressed in patience, meekness, love, and good deeds.” In other words, one way to feel more of divine Love is to desire and then to live more of that love of Love in our daily lives.

Perhaps the inability of the human mind to heal us is most obvious when we feel stuck in behavior we know is not good. When we’ve exhausted what we know to do, don’t we reach out intuitively to a power higher and wiser than ourselves to help us move forward? For example, Tad Blake-Weber was addicted to marijuana and wanted to stop. He found help through prayer and felt that the insights he needed came from a divine source. He explains: “I could see that God’s love includes the joy, bliss, and spiritual understanding we all yearn for.” He was freed from the addiction and moved forward to help others through what he was learning.

These life experiences give us hints of a divine influence that is always present to aid us. And this aid came in the form of a better understanding of the nature of God as Love. To me, seeking this better understanding is a direction we can all walk in.

 

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About Author

Van Driessen

As the media and legislative liaison for Christian Science for the State of New York, I write about spirituality and health from my perspective as a Christian Science practitioner. I enjoy connecting with health reporters and editors to learn what they have found regarding the impact of thought and consciousness on health, and to share what I’ve learned through my years of experience in helping many people find healing through prayer. I loved being an active part of my children growing up years, and now enjoy my work and when possible being outside participating in life (usually with my wife) biking, walking, jogging, roller blading, and avoiding the cars in my midtown Manhattan neighborhood.

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